Nesta Report 'Data for Good' feat chapter by UPSI and Cardiff University Researchers on Community Mobilisation After Lee Rigby Murder

New ways of capturing, sharing and analysing data have the potential to transform how community and voluntary sector organisations work and how social action happens. However, while analysing and using data is core to how some of the world’s fastest growing businesses understand their customers and develop new products and services, civil society organisations are still some way off from making the most of this potential.

Over the last 12 months Nesta has grant funded a number of research projects that explore two dimensions of how big and open data can be used for the common good. Firstly, how it can be used by charities to develop better products and services and secondly, how it can help those interested in civil society better understand social action and civil society activity.

Five organisations, including UPSI were grant funded to explore how data–driven methods, such as open data analysis and social media analysis, can help us understand informal social action, often referred to as ‘below the radar activity’ in new ways.

The report Data For Good includes a chapter highlighting UPSI's work, funded by Nesta, entitled Soft facts and spontaneous community mobilisation: the role of rumour after major crime events written by Colin Roberts, Martin Innes, Alun Preece and Irena Spasic.

More information on Nesta's work can be found at www.nesta.org.uk