New Report: Strategic Police - Community Engagement: A Report to the Scottish Police Authority

Strategic Police-Community Engagement: A Report to the Scottish Police Authority

by Martin Innes

The report was commissioned by the Scottish Police Authority to examine the issue of strategic police community engagement in England and Wales. It addresses a notable gap in the research evidence base in that, whilst there has been considerable attention paid to operational and tactical forms of engagement often in relation to community policing programmes, more strategic uses have been neglected. The analysis conducted is used to inform a position about how and why the development of a methodology for strategic engagement by police organisations is likely to be significant in the future.  For the purposes of this report ‘strategic community engagement’ is defined as formal interaction and communication with members of the public that is undertaken to inform policy development and strategic decision making. In this sense, it is distinct from more operational forms of engagement that directly shape service delivery at a local level.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL REPORT

CLICK HERE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE INQUIRY


Dr Colin Roberts joins UN experts meeting in Tunis on Policing & Use of Force in Law Enforcement

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is running a series of regional experts meetings to consider use of force by police forces and other law enforcement agencies as well as by private security providers in partnership with the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (Geneva Academy). The meetings, which bring together governmental, intergovernmental, and non-governmental experts from each region, are looking in particular at how the 1990 Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials have been reflected in national legislation and operational policies and procedures across the region.

The meetings include consideration of key issues from each region, including, as a cross-cutting theme, the treatment and protection of vulnerable groups, such as persons with disabilities, children, and women. The Geneva Academy will research and draft a background paper on applicable international law and policies to be circulated to participants in advance of each experts meeting. Experts will be asked to deliver presentations on their national or regional framework and experiences. The aim of the meetings is to share lessons learned and identify good practice at national and regional level, with a view to feeding into the Thirteenth Crime Congress in Doha in April 2015.

UPSI's Dr. Colin Roberts joins the meeting in Tunis, which brings together experts from the Middle East and North Africa region, to speak on the UNBPUFF Special Provisions on the use of lethal force and firearms.

Dyfed-Powys centre to help tackle 'neglected' rural policing

UPSI and Dyfed-Powys Police are helping set up a centre of excellence to improve rural policing with the Police Commissioner saying it will lead to people feeling safer.

Christopher Salmon said rural policing developments have been "neglected" compared with urban policing.

The College of Policing, responsible for the training and development of police officers, has given £44,000 towards setting up the project.

It will work with academics to develop and share best practice with police.

Dyfed-Powys Police and the commissioner will collaborate with the Cardiff-based Universities' Police Science Institute (UPSI) and others specialists at Aberystwyth University and University of Wales Trinity Saint David to start a "high-level network to develop new expertise in keeping rural communities safe from crime".

...little attention has been directed to the particular policing needs of people living and working in rural areas”

Christopher Salmon Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commisioner

Mr Salmon said: "The work we do with UPSI and others will lead to people in some of our most isolated areas feeling safer.

"What works in policing in rural areas and communities is an issue that has been neglected by researchers, policy makers and practitioners.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE

Fear vs terror: signal crimes, counter-terrorism, and the Charlie Hebdo killings

Headline image credit: Paris rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015. Photo by “sébastien amiet;l”. CC BY 2.0 via Flickr. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/01/fear-terror-signal-crimes-counter-terrorism-charlie-hebdo/#sthash.MEigEKOU.dpuf

Headline image credit: Paris rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015. Photo by “sébastien amiet;l”. CC BY 2.0 via Flickr. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/01/fear-terror-signal-crimes-counter-terrorism-charlie-hebdo/#sthash.MEigEKOU.dpuf

Oxford University Press blog by Martin Innes

Signal crimes change how we think, feel, and act — altering perceptions of the distribution of risks and threats in the world. Sometimes, as with the recent assassinations and mass shootings in France, sending a message is the intention of the criminal act. The attackers’ target selection of the staff of Charlie Hebdo magazine, and that of taking and killing Jewish hostages, was deliberately designed to send messages to individuals and institutions.

Researchers examine social reactions to different kinds of crime events and the signals they send to a range of audiences. The aim is to determine how and why certain kinds of incidents and situations generate fear and anxiety responses that travel widely and, by extension, how processes of social reaction to such events are managed and influenced by the authorities.

The murder of Lee Rigby in London in 2013 can be understood as a signal crime as it triggered concern amongst the general public and across security institutions, owing to the macabre innovation of the killers in undertaking a brutally simple form of assault. Analysis of the crime has identified a number of key components to the overarching process of social reaction. Observing how events have unfolded in France, the collective reactions have followed a similar trajectory to what happened in London.

See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/01/fear-terror-signal-crimes-counter-terrorism-charlie-hebdo/#sthash.MEigEKOU.dpuf

UPSI to launch report on spontaneous community mobilisation in the aftermath of the Lee Rigby murder at NESTA event on Big & Open Data

UPSI's Director Prof. Martin Innes and Prof. Alun Preece from Cardiff University's School of Computer Sciences will officially launch a report on spontaneous community mobilisation in the aftermath of the Lee Rigby murder at NESTA's event on Big & Open Data For The Common Good.

The free event will take place in London on the 18th February.

The day will include presentation and discussion of the following projects:

  • Analysing data to identify emerging social issues: Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) and Datakind have partnered to explore how a data driven approach to mining the rich data that CAB hold on social issues in the UK can be used to develop a national map of emerging social issues, such as payday loans.

  • Understanding hidden social action: Nesta has funded 5 research grants to explore how data driven methods, such as open data analysis and social media analysis, can help us understand new types of informal social action, often referred to as “below the radar activity”.

  • 360 giving: Nesta’s work with Indigo Trust to develop a funder-collaborative that is openly publishing spending data from the UK’s major funding bodies and philanthropists. 360giving will help the sector create better intelligence on its activities and will ultimately enable more effective collaborations and decision making.

  • Open Data Challenge Series: Through Nesta’s partnership with the Open Data Institute, this series of Challenge prizes is encouraging teams to develop viable products and services for social good using open data predominantly from the public sector.

CLICK HERE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER