Counter-Terrorism Policing

From Minutes to Months

Academics at the Crime and Security Research Institute (CSRI) lead an international team of analysts from the University of New South Wales, Michigan State University and the Canadian Society of Evidence Based Policing to learn the lessons from researching recent terror attacks in the UK, US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia.

Soft Facts & Digital Behavioural Influencing

Researchers from the Crime and Security Research Institute have studied how fake news spreads on social media in the aftermath of major terrorist attacks and what the police can do to manage its impacts upon public behaviours.

SENTINEL: Localised Situational Awareness via Social Media

The Sentinel platform provides a multi-level interface into information extracted from the social Web. The purpose of this platform is to evaluate to what degree social media data can be converted into actionable intelligence relating to public-interest events and topics in terms of reliability, usability and timeliness.

Open Source Communications, Analytics Research (OSCAR)

The Open Source Communications Analytics Research Centre (OSCAR) led by Cardiff University was funded via the Police Knowledge Fund by the College of Policing and the Higher Education Funding Council for England, to look at how the police service is using social media and ‘big data technologies’.

Tackling Radicalisation in Dispersed Societies (TaRDiS)

Working in partnership with the London Borough of Sutton and the Police Academy of the Netherlands, UPSI conducted a programme of research, funded by the European Commission, to explore how the risks of radicalisation can be reduced.

After Woolwich: Social Reactions on Social Media

The murder of Drummer Lee Rigby on the 22nd May 2013 in Woolwich rapidly acquired the properties of a signal crime (Innes, 2004). The changes to public and institutional perceptions of security were amplified by a series of secondary incidents of violence in the days and weeks following the original crime.